9 C
Munich

61% of voters disapprove of Supreme Court decision overturning Roe

Must read

[ad_1]

People march together to protest the Supreme Court’s decision in the Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health case on June 24, 2022 in Miami, Florida. 

Allison Dinner | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

On the one-year anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court overturning the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, 6-in-10 voters remain opposed to the court removing the national right to abortion, according to results from a new national NBC News poll.

That includes nearly 80% of female voters ages 18-49, two-thirds of suburban women, 60% of independents and even a third of Republican voters who say they disapprove.

And by more than a 2-to-1 margin, voters say abortion access across the country has become too difficult rather than too easy. A plurality — 43% — say their home state has struck the right balance, though there’s a considerable geographical difference on this question.

“Without a doubt, the issue of abortion will continue to shape our country’s political and electoral landscape moving forward,” said Democratic pollster Aileen Cardona-Arroyo of Hart Research Associates, which conducted this survey with Republican pollster Bill McInturff and his team at Public Opinion Strategies.

“The data is stable and clear — a majority of voters support at least some access to abortion,” McInturff added. “A year after the Dobbs decision, though, there is no change in voters saying access is too difficult in their state.”

In the poll, 61% of all voters say they disapprove of the 5-4 decision, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which leaves the legality and conditions of abortion up to individual states.

The total includes a majority of voters — 53% — who strongly disapprove of the decision.

That’s compared with 36% of voters who say they approve of the decision, including 27% who strongly approve.

Those numbers are essentially unchanged from a Sept. 2022 NBC News poll — conducted two months before last year’s midterm elections — when an identical 61% said they disapproved of overturning Roe v. Wade, versus 37% who approved.

And they’re nearly unmoved from Aug. 2022 — two months after the Dobbs decision — when 58% disapproved, while 38% approved.

Inside the new numbers, majorities of men (55%) and women (67%); white (57%), Latino (70%) and Black voters (78%); and urban (71%) and suburban residents (57%) all disapprove of the Dobbs decision.

By comparison, majorities of Republicans (65%) and rural voters (53%) say they approve of the decision.

Cardona-Arroyo, the Democratic pollster, added that there’s an intensity gap between the parties — with 87% of Democrats strongly disapproving of Roe’s overturn, versus 52% of Republicans who strongly approve.

“As abortion remains a salient electoral issue, this could have implications for how the issue impacts turnout and mobilization,” she said.

Abortion rights demonstrators gather outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., US, on June 24, 2022.

Yasin Ozturk | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

The NBC News poll also finds 22% of registered voters saying abortion access has become too difficult in their state, 17% saying it’s too easy and 43% saying their state has struck the right balance.

But there’s a geographical difference here: Majorities of voters in West (57%) and Northeast (55%) say their states have struck the right balance, versus 38% in the Midwest and just 29% in the South.

When asked about abortion access nationwide, 53% say it’s become too difficult, 23% say it’s become too easy and 13% say the nation has struck the right balance.

“While voters are generally more resolute in the perception that abortion access is too difficult at the national level, they are less critical of access in their own states,” said Cardona-Arroyo.

The NBC News poll was conducted June 16-20 of 1,000 registered voters — 831 of whom were reached by cell phone — and it has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.1 percentage points.

The rest of the NBC News poll will be released in the coming days.

[ad_2]

Source link

- Advertisement -spot_img

More articles

- Advertisement -spot_img

Latest article